Setting up for Failure

That’s what she said! If you make goals that are too hard to achieve, you’re just setting yourself up for failure.

Crap. Let me say that again. Crap.

Goals that are easily achievable and don’t stretch the boundaries, that don’t make you push yourself to do better, go harder, farther, faster, more – aren’t worth calling goals. That is a schedule.

Yes, a schedule should be a little more realistic. Not too much more, though. I mean, where’s the fun in leaping over tall buildings that don’t even stretch the calf muscle. What’s the point of looking at the stars but only marking up the first few inches of the slope? What’s the point?

A goal has an end point: a dream made real. It makes the dream achievable by marking out the pathway – the stairs that lead up. Dreams are not easy. They don’t just come to you because you want it, or you’d like to do it, or everyone says you’ve got the talent to get there. It takes more. Much more.

It takes setting that bar high enough that each time you go out there, you have to fight to get over it, and you really feel it when you do.

The other side of the bar is an achievement and a boost to get you to the next one.

But if you get a day, or even two days, where the bar comes crashing down – what do you do then?

Put it back up there, in the same place, and try again.

Don’t (this is experience here) try to add the failure to the height of the bar next time. Now that truly is setting yourself up to fail.

Each day is a new day, and each new day is a new goal. That goal should be achievable, but tough. You should know, without doubt, that you put everything you had into achieving that thing, and that it was worth it, and you’re worth the end result.

It’s about our dreams. You can dream and dream and dream, but if you don’t set that bar and at least try to leap over at every opportunity, then it will remain a dream.

When you get the chance to turn your dream into a reality, when you become the best you possible, guess how that makes you feel?

Can you feel it? The potential to indulge in that moment of exultation because you did it, and you did it in the face of people who say what she said to me.

“Make the target easier, so you can succeed. Don’t set yourself up for failure.”

[read a swear word here] that! If I don’t put in the effort to make each and every step tougher than everyone else’s, then I’m going to end up sitting on that bottom step (with the rest of the crowd) and saying (often as I’m hearing them laugh at me), “but I tried, isn’t that good enough?”

You know the answer to that – I know the answer to that. If the goal isn’t achievable, how can you find a way to make it achievable? If the goal is achievable, is it hard enough for you to know and feel the achievement was worth it?

If the goal isn’t achievable, then it’s a dream; so how can you find a way to make it achievable? Break the dream down into goals that lead to the end result. If the goal is achievable, is it hard enough for you to know and feel the achievement was worth it? If it changes direction when you get part-way along the path, do you struggle through, or take stock and re-think? Does it matter how you do it, as long as you know when to push and when to sidestep, when to plough on and when to move aside? When you know what is best for you to achieve your goal?

Is the dream the same dream at the end as it was in the beginning? Things change, you know, as we travel our paths.

And then, as is usually the case, does the achievement of the dream outline the next path in your life? A stronger and better you who can now see the light through the dark forest.


A garbled post, put out in a moment of angst (that’s annoyance, mainly at people who try to stop you in your tracks), and it’s in place of my usual Sunday post (that’s tomorrow, Australian time) because I’ve got a schedule to keep, and wayward co-contributors to pull back into line after being battered by ‘them’ – the ones who caused this rant.

Ciao!

blue-jump

 

 

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